A Sephardi Life in Southeastern Europe

This man whose intellectual life was a pure product of western European emancipationist Judaism, who had devoted most of his public career to spreading this message, nevertheless remained in the East, and a man of the East.

A Sephardi Life in Southeastern Europe

Autobiographical texts are rare in the Sephardi world. Gabriel Ari�s writings provide a special perspective on the political, economic, and cultural changes undergone by the Eastern Sephardi community in the decades before its dissolution, in regions where it had been constituted since the expulsion from Spain in 1492. His history is a fascinating memoir of the Sephardi and Levantine bourgeoisie of the time. For his entire life, Ari�teacher, historian, community leader, and businessman�was caught between East and West. Born in a small provincial town in Ottoman Bulgaria in 1863, he witnessed the disappearance of a social and political order that had lasted for centuries and its replacement by new ideas and new ways of life, which would irreversibly transform Jewish existence. A Sephardi Life in Southeastern Europe publishes in full the autobiography (covering the years 1863-1906) and journal (1906-39) of Gabriel Ari�, along with selections from his letters to the Alliance Isra�lite Universelle. An introduction by Esther Benbassa and Aron Rodrigue analyzes his life and examines the general and the Jewish contexts of the Levant at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries.

More Books:

A Sephardi Life in Southeastern Europe
Language: en
Pages: 333
Authors: Esther Benbassa, Aron Rodrigue
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-05-01 - Publisher: University of Washington Press

Autobiographical texts are rare in the Sephardi world. Gabriel Ari�s writings provide a special perspective on the political, economic, and cultural changes undergone by the Eastern Sephardi community in the decades before its dissolution, in regions where it had been constituted since the expulsion from Spain in 1492. His history
A Sephardi Life in Southeastern Europe
Language: en
Pages: 317
Authors: Gabriel Arie, Gabriel Arié
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 1998 - Publisher: Samuel and Althea Stroum Book

A Sephardi Life in Southeastern Europe publishes in full the autobiography (covering the years 1863-1906) and journal (1906-39) of Gabriel Arie, along with selections from his letters to the Alliance Israelite Universelle. An introduction by Esther Benbassa and Aron Rodrigue analyzes his life and examines the general and the Jewish
Imperial Subjects
Language: de
Pages: 505
Authors: Martin Aust, Frithjof Benjamin Schenk
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-10-28 - Publisher: Böhlau Verlag Köln Weimar

Der Band befasst sich mit dem Wechselverhältnis von autobiographischer Praxis und historischem Wandel im Russischen Reich, in der Habsburgermonarchie und dem Osmanischen Reich im Zeitalter der anbrechenden Moderne. In den drei Imperien kam es seit Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts zu einem Boom autobiographischen Schreibens und Publizierens. Wie, so wird gefragt,
Sephardi Lives
Language: en
Pages: 480
Authors: Julia Philips Cohen, Sarah Abrevaya Stein
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-08-27 - Publisher: Stanford University Press

This ground-breaking documentary history contains over 150 primary sources originally written in 15 languages by or about Sephardi Jews—descendants of Jews who fled medieval Spain and Portugal settling in the western portions of the Ottoman Empire, including the Balkans, Anatolia, and Palestine. Reflecting Sephardi history in all its diversity, from
Ladino Rabbinic Literature and Ottoman Sephardic Culture
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Matthias B. Lehmann
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-11-03 - Publisher: Indiana University Press

In this pathbreaking book, Matthias B. Lehmann explores Ottoman Sephardic culture in an era of change through a close study of popularized rabbinic texts written in Ladino, the vernacular language of the Ottoman Jews. This vernacular literature, standing at the crossroads of rabbinic elite and popular cultures and of Hebrew