Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Hypertension

Hypertension is recognized to be one of the major risk factors for the development of peripheral vascular disease.

Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Hypertension

Hypertension is recognized to be one of the major risk factors for the development of peripheral vascular disease. The last decade has witnessed several major advances in therapy for hypertension, including the development of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium channel blockers. These compounds have greatly improved the ability to control blood pressure and to reduce the impact of this risk factor on morbidity and mortality. In spite of these advances, cardiovascular disease remains a major health problem in most modern industrialized countries with related deaths exceeding those from all other causes combined. In contrast to these advances in therapy, our understanding of the basic mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of hypertension remains incomplete. Recent studies have produced new insights into the nature of the regulation of muscle contraction in both heart and blood vessels as well as the changes in muscle function that occur in hypertension. However, the effects of antihypertensive therapy, both in terms of restoring normal function and in producing reversal of hypertension-associated changes, has not been as thoroughly studied, especially in the vasculature. Studies in the heart suggest that the efficacy of different therapeutic agents in restoring normal function and reversing hypertensive changes vary substantially with the mechanism of action of the therapeutic agent. It has also been recently determined that some therapeutic agents produce adverse effects on plasma lipid profiles, which could lead to the secondary acceleration of the atherosclerotic process, while at the same time normalizing blood pressure.

More Books:

Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Hypertension
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Robert H. Cox
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-03-08 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

Hypertension is recognized to be one of the major risk factors for the development of peripheral vascular disease. The last decade has witnessed several major advances in therapy for hypertension, including the development of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium channel blockers. These compounds have greatly improved the ability to control
Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Hypertension
Language: en
Pages: 262
Authors: Robert H Cox
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992-01-31 - Publisher:

Books about Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Hypertension
Molecular Mechanisms in Hypertension
Language: en
Pages: 458
Authors: Richard N. Re
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006-04-19 - Publisher: CRC Press

Authoritative and insightful, this important text provides an update on the latest advances in the areas of biomedical research that are at the interface of science and clinical medicine, where new discoveries in genetics, molecular and cell biology are not only enhancing our understanding of the etiology and progression of
Molecular Mechanisms in Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricle Dysfunction
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Harry Karmouty-Quintana, Christophe Guignabert, Grazyna Kwapiszewska, Mark L. Ormiston
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-03-20 - Publisher: Frontiers Media SA

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disorder of the pulmonary vasculature defined by increased mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) leading to right ventricle (RV) hypertrophy and dysfunction, right-sided heart failure and ultimately death. PH is a common complication of chronic lung diseases (CLD) including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) or chronic obstructive
Vascular Smooth Muscle Function in Hypertension
Language: en
Pages: 96
Authors: Theodora Szasz, Rita C. A. Tostes
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-10-23 - Publisher: Biota Publishing

Hypertension is defined by an increase in systemic blood pressure above limits considered normal, currently set at 140 mmHg for systolic and 90 mmHg for diastolic pressure. Assuming central venous pressure to be near zero, mean arterial pressure is determined by the product of total peripheral resistance and cardiac output.