Early Modern English Marginalia

The chapters of this book go beyond the case study, however, and raise broad historical, cultural, and theoretical questions about the strange, marvelous, metamorphic thing we call the book, and the equally mul- tiplicitous, eccentric, and ...

Early Modern English Marginalia

Marginalia in early modern and medieval texts – printed, handwrit- ten, drawn, scratched, colored, and pasted in – offer a glimpse of how people, as individuals and in groups, interacted with books and manu- scripts over often lengthy periods of time. The chapters in this volume build on earlier scholarship that established marginalia as an intellec- tual method (Grafton and Jardine), as records of reading motivated by cultural, social, theological, and personal inclinations (Brayman [Hackel] and Orgel), and as practices inspired by material affordances particular to the book and the pen (Fleming and Sherman). They further the study of the practices of marginalia as a mode – a set of ways in which material opportunities and practices overlap with intellectual, social, and personal motivations to make meaning in the world. They introduce us to a set of idiosyncratic examples such as the trace marks of objects left in books, deliberately or by accident; cut-and-pasted additions to printed volumes; a marriage depicted through shared book ownership. They reveal to us in case studies the unique value of mar- ginalia as evidence of phenomena as important and diverse as religious change, authorial self-invention, and the history of the literary canon. The chapters of this book go beyond the case study, however, and raise broad historical, cultural, and theoretical questions about the strange, marvelous, metamorphic thing we call the book, and the equally mul- tiplicitous, eccentric, and inscrutable beings who accompany them through history: readers and writers.

More Books:

Early Modern English Marginalia
Language: en
Pages: 302
Authors: Katherine Acheson
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-12-17 - Publisher: Routledge

Marginalia in early modern and medieval texts – printed, handwrit- ten, drawn, scratched, colored, and pasted in – offer a glimpse of how people, as individuals and in groups, interacted with books and manu- scripts over often lengthy periods of time. The chapters in this volume build on earlier scholarship
Women’s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England
Language: en
Pages: 336
Authors: Valerie Wayne
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-05-14 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

This collection reveals the valuable work that women achieved in publishing, printing, writing and reading early modern English books, from those who worked in the book trade to those who composed, selected, collected and annotated books. Women gathered rags for paper production, invested in books and oversaw the presses that
Marginal Notes
Language: en
Pages: 294
Authors: Patrick Spedding, Paul Tankard
Categories: Books
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher: Springer Nature

Marginal Notes: Social Reading and the Literal Margins offers an account of literary marginalia based on original research from a range of unique archival sources, from mid-16th-century France to early 20th-century Tasmania. Chapters examine marginal commentary from 17th-century China, 18th-century Britain, and 19th-century America, investigating the reputations, as reflected by
Communities of Print
Language: en
Pages: 268
Authors: Rosamund Oates, Jessica G. Purdy
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-09-27 - Publisher: BRILL

This book provides a new perspective on book history, with essays from leading scholars showing how communities of writers, publishers and readers across early modern Europe shaped the consumption of print.
Margins and Marginality
Language: en
Pages: 194
Authors: Evelyn B. Tribble
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993 - Publisher: University of Virginia Press

Examines commentary written in the margins of the text to show how the pages of the first printed books became the arena for struggled among authors, readers, and cultural authorities. Focuses on four controversies: the printed English Bible, two rivals for court favor, Martin Marprelate's theological pamphlets, and the glossed