Mythic Patterns in Ibsen s Last Plays

In this connection it is interesting to note that in only two of his last plays did Ibsen attempt a positive conclusion, and those two plays are aesthetically the least convincing and satisfying of the lot. Ibsen's "new mythology" ...

Mythic Patterns in Ibsen s Last Plays

Mythic Patterns in Ibsen's Last Plays was first published in 1970. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. Until recently critics have tended to regard Ibsen principally as a social dramatist, one who was concerned primarily with the political, social, and moral questions of his time. Radical though he was in the Victorian era, his ideas, with the passage o time, ceased to be avant garde,and for this reason many critics have dismissed him as outdated. Professor Holtan examines a major portion of Ibsen's work, his last eight plays, in a new perspective, however, and finds much that is of lasting significance and interest. Ibsen's initial impact came with the publication in 1879 of A Doll's House,the play which seemingly advocates a woman's right to leave her husband and children. His reputation as a social dramatist was only furthered by the appearance of his next two plays, Ghosts and An Enemy of the People. But Professor Holtan's study of the plays which came after these identifies in the later plays values which transcend the social problems of their time, penetrating questions of the human spirit itself. The eight last plays which Professor Holtan examines in this study are The Wild Duck, Rosmersholm, The Lady from the Sea, Hedda Gabler, The Master Builder, Little Eyolf, John Gabriel Borkman, and When We Dead Awaken. In these plays he identifies a mythic pattern and unity based in elements of symbolism and mysticism which have puzzled or annoyed readers and critics for years. In his mythic vision Ibsen's lasting contribution far exceeds that of his invention of the social-problem drama, Professor Holtan concludes.

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Mythic Patterns in Ibsen's Last Plays
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Orley I. Holtan
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1970 - Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

Mythic Patterns in Ibsen's Last Plays was first published in 1970. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. Until recently critics have tended to regard Ibsen principally as a social dramatist, one
Ibsen and the Greeks
Language: en
Pages: 209
Authors: Norman Rhodes
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995 - Publisher: Bucknell University Press

"Was Ibsen influenced by Greek culture? Were allusions to the Greeks configured in the Norwegian playwright's works? According to author Norman Rhodes, whether consciously or unconsciously, many of Ibsen's plays are encoded with veiled references to ancient Greek culture. Rhodes also postulates that Ibsen's perception of the importance of the
Kämpfe als Spiele
Language: de
Pages: 311
Authors: Dietrich Jäger
Categories: American drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Königshausen & Neumann

Books about Kämpfe als Spiele
Ibsen's Drama
Language: en
Pages: 185
Authors: Einar Ingvald Haugen
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1979 - Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

Examines Ibsen's life and work, the ideas that shaped his art, and the influence he had on modern literature and thought
The Cambridge Companion to Ibsen
Language: en
Pages: 271
Authors: James McFarlane, Professor of European Literature James McFarlane
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

In the history of modern theatre, Ibsen is one of the dominating figures. The sixteen chapters of this 1994 Companion explore his life and work, providing an invaluable reference work for students. In chronological terms they range from an account of Ibsen's earliest pieces, through the years of rich experimentation,