The Economic Superorganism

In The Economic Superorganism, you will discover stories, data, science, and philosophy to guide you through the arguments from competing narratives on energy, growth, and policy.

The Economic Superorganism

Energy drives the economy, economics informs policy, and policy affects social outcomes. Since the oil crises of the 1970s, pundits have debated the validity of this sequence, but most economists and politicians still ignore it. Thus, they delude the public about the underlying influence of energy costs and constraints on economic policies that address such pressing contemporary issues as income inequality, growth, debt, and climate change. To understand why, Carey King explores the scientific and rhetorical basis of the competing narratives both within and between energy technology and economics. Energy and economic discourse seems to mirror Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion: For every narrative there is an equal and opposite counter-narrative. The competing energy narratives pit "drill, baby, drill!" against renewable technologies such as wind and solar. Both claim to provide secure, reliable, clean, and affordable energy to support economic growth with the most benefit to society, but how? To answer this question, we need to understand the competing economic narratives, techno-optimism and techno-realism. Techno-optimism claims that innovation overcomes any physical resource constraints and enables the social outcomes and economic growth we desire. Techno-realism, in contrast, states that no matter what energy technologies we use, feedbacks from physical growth on a finite planet constrain economic growth and create an uneven distribution of social impacts. In The Economic Superorganism, you will discover stories, data, science, and philosophy to guide you through the arguments from competing narratives on energy, growth, and policy. You will be able to distinguish the technically possible from the socially viable, and understand how our future depends on this distinction.

More Books:

The Economic Superorganism
Language: en
Pages: 466
Authors: Carey W. King
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-08 - Publisher: Springer

Energy drives the economy, economics informs policy, and policy affects social outcomes. Since the oil crises of the 1970s, pundits have debated the validity of this sequence, but most economists and politicians still ignore it. Thus, they delude the public about the underlying influence of energy costs and constraints on
The Economic Superorganism
Language: en
Pages: 466
Authors: Carey W. King
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-07 - Publisher: Springer Nature

Energy drives the economy, economics informs policy, and policy affects social outcomes. Since the oil crises of the 1970s, pundits have debated the validity of this sequence, but most economists and politicians still ignore it. Thus, they delude the public about the underlying influence of energy costs and constraints on
The New Economics
Language: en
Pages: 140
Authors: Steve Keen
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-11-11 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

In 1517, Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the wall of Wittenberg church. He argued that the Church’s internally consistent but absurd doctrines had pickled into a dogmatic structure of untruth. It was time for a Reformation. Half a millennium later, Steve Keen argues that economics needs its own
Understanding the Private–Public Divide
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: Avner Offer
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-04-30 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

A distinctive new account of why markets focus on short-term goals, while government needs to concentrate on society's long-term interests.
Ultrasocial
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: John M. Gowdy
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-07-31 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Ultrasocial argues that rather than environmental destruction and extreme inequality being due to human nature, they are the result of the adoption of agriculture by our ancestors. Human economy has become an ultrasocial superorganism (similar to an ant or termite colony), with the requirements of superorganism taking precedence over the