The Merchant of Venice English Version Annotated

But, this is on the condition that Antonio signs a bond promising that if the debt goes unpaid, Antonio will give Shylock a pound of his own flesh.

The Merchant of Venice  English Version   Annotated

The Merchant of Venice opens on a street in Venice (there are streets and not just canals in Venice--who knew?) where Antonio, a Venetian merchant, complains of a sadness he can't quite explain. His friends suggest they'd be sad too if they had as much merchandise to worry about as Antonio. Apparently all of his money is tied up in various sea ventures to exotic locales. But Antonio is certain it's not money that's bothering him.Antonio's friend Bassanio enters the scene, and we learn that Bassanio has been at the forefront of Antonio's mind. Apparently Bassanio just got back from a secret trip to see an heiress named Portia in Belmont. Bassanio financed his trip (and in fact, his entire lifestyle) by borrowing tons of money from Antonio. Portia is beautiful, intelligent, and, most important, rich. If Bassanio could only get together the appearance of some wealth, he would be in a good position to compete with all the other guys vying for Portia's attention. If they marry, he's all set financially. Antonio would be happy to lend Bassanio the money he needs to woo Portia, except, as we know, all of Antonio's money is at sea. The two friends part ways, agreeing that they'll try to raise the funds on Antonio's credit around town.Meanwhile, even rich heiresses have their troubles. Portia is plagued by suitors from the four corners of the earth but isn't allowed to choose the one she wants. Instead, her father, before his death, devised an unusual test. Three caskets--one gold, one silver, and one lead--are laid out before each suitor, and whoever picks the right one gets the girl. (It sounds like a twist on Goldilocks and the Three Bears.) Portia complains about all of the important men who come to see her, as there's something wrong with each of them.As Portia is trying to figure out how to avoid marrying, Bassanio is trying to figure out how to marry her. He negotiates with the Jewish moneylender, Shylock, asking for 3,000 gold coins (ducats). Bassanio borrows the money on his friend Antonio's credit. Trouble is, Antonio is an anti-Semite (he is prejudiced against Jewish people) and is offensive to Shylock whenever he has the chance. Slyly, Shylock says he'll try out Antonio's method of business by lending him the money interest-free. But, this is on the condition that Antonio signs a bond promising that if the debt goes unpaid, Antonio will give Shylock a pound of his own flesh. This seems like a good idea at the time (um, it does?) as Antonio is sure he'll have earned the money from his ships before Shylock's due date.Before we have time to think about what a crazy idea it is to promise anyone a pound of your flesh, we're back at Belmont learning the rules of the casket game. Choose wrong, and not only do you fail to get Portia, but you cannot marry anyone for the rest of your life. We see suitors fail when they choose the wrong caskets.Meanwhile, Jessica (Shylock's only child) tells us that living in Shylock's house is pure hell and that she's ashamed to be his daughter. Ouch. She has decided to elope with Lorenzo and convert to Christianity. Jessica gets her chance to carry out her rebellious scheme when her dad leaves the house to go to dinner. As soon as he is out the door, Jessica steals off with her lover, Lorenzo, and helps herself to a chunk of Dad's cash.We also learn from some gossipy cats in Venice that Shylock was livid when he learned his daughter ran away, screaming "'My daughter! O my ducats! O my daughter! / Fled with a Christian! O my Christian ducats!" (2.8.15-16). (Check out the priorities here--he's about as angry about the fact his gold is gone as he is about the fact his bouncing baby girl is gone.) This is good news for Antonio, who hates Shylock. But Antonio doesn't stay happy for long, as he is too busy recovering from the fact that Bassanio has gone off to woo Portia.Back in gossipy Venice, we hear that Antonio's ships have been sinking left and right. Shylock...

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The Merchant of Venice (English Version) (Annotated)
Language: en
Pages: 141
Authors: William Shakespeare
Categories:
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-04-20 - Publisher:

The Merchant of Venice opens on a street in Venice (there are streets and not just canals in Venice--who knew?) where Antonio, a Venetian merchant, complains of a sadness he can't quite explain. His friends suggest they'd be sad too if they had as much merchandise to worry about as
The Merchant of Venice
Language: en
Pages: 200
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Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-06-05 - Publisher: Ratna Sagar P Limited

Presents the original text of Shakespeare's play side by side with a paraphrased version and gives brief background on the author, the sources of the play, society in Elizabethan England, and the play's plot, themes, characters, and figures of speech.
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Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: William Shakespeare
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Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-06-05 - Publisher: Ratna Sagar P Limited

The Merchant of Venice of the Ratna Sagar Shakespeare Series is enriched with text based on the A W Verity edition, line-by-line translation of text into modern English, plenty of short notes that explain and interpret the text, summary of each scene, as well as useful commentary on the life
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Pages:
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Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-03-31 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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