The Papers of Frederick Law Olmsted

See Susan L. Klaus, “All in the Family: The Olmsted Office and the Business ofLandscape Architecture,” Landscape Journal 16, vol. 1 (Spring 1997), pp. 80–95; Cynthia Zaitzevsky, Frederick Law Olmsted and the Boston Park System ...

The Papers of Frederick Law Olmsted

Frederick Law Olmsted relocated from New York to the Boston area in the early 1880s. With the help of his stepson and partner, John Charles Olmsted, his professional office grew to become the first of its kind: a modern landscape architecture practice with park, subdivision, campus, residential, and other landscape design projects throughout the country. During the period covered in this volume, Olmsted and his partners, apprentices, and staff designed the exceptional park system of Boston and Brookline—including the Back Bay Fens, Franklin Park, and the Muddy River Improvement. Olmsted also designed parks for New York City, Rochester, Buffalo, and Detroit and created his most significant campus plans for Stanford University and the Lawrenceville School. The grounds of the U.S. Capitol were completed with the addition of the grand marble terraces that he designed as the transition to his surrounding landscape. Many of Olmsted’s most important private commissions belong to these years. He began his work at Biltmore, the vast estate of George Washington Vanderbilt, and designed Rough Point at Newport, Rhode Island, and several other estates for members of the Vanderbilt family. Olmsted wrote more frequently on the subject of landscape design during these years than in any comparable period. He would never provide a definitive treatise or textbook on landscape architecture, but the articles presented in this volume contain some of his most mature and powerful statements on the practice of landscape architecture.

More Books:

The Papers of Frederick Law Olmsted
Language: en
Pages: 856
Authors: Frederick Law Olmsted
Categories: Architecture
Type: BOOK - Published: 1977 - Publisher: JHU Press

Frederick Law Olmsted relocated from New York to the Boston area in the early 1880s. With the help of his stepson and partner, John Charles Olmsted, his professional office grew to become the first of its kind: a modern landscape architecture practice with park, subdivision, campus, residential, and other landscape
The Environment and the People in American Cities, 1600s-1900s
Language: en
Pages: 639
Authors: Dorceta E. Taylor
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-11-23 - Publisher: Duke University Press

In The Environment and the People in American Cities, Dorceta E. Taylor provides an in-depth examination of the development of urban environments, and urban environmentalism, in the United States. Taylor focuses on the evolution of the city, the emergence of elite reformers, the framing of environmental problems, and the perceptions
Spying on the South
Language: en
Pages: 512
Authors: Tony Horwitz
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-05-14 - Publisher: Penguin

The New York Times-bestselling final book by the beloved, Pulitzer-Prize winning historian Tony Horwitz. With Spying on the South, the best-selling author of Confederates in the Attic returns to the South and the Civil War era for an epic adventure on the trail of America's greatest landscape architect. In the
Morality and Utility in American Antislavery Reform
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Louis S. Gerteis
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-11-09 - Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

From the late colonial period through the Civil War, slavery developed as the most powerful obstacle to the triumph of liberal values in America. In the second quarter of the nineteenth century, the ambiguities of the revolutionary generation's accomodation of slavery gave way to a direct and violent conflict between
Genius of Place
Language: en
Pages: 496
Authors: Justin Martin
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-05-31 - Publisher: Hachette UK

The full and definitive biography of Frederick Law Olmsted, influential abolitionist, ardent social reformer and conservationist, and the visionary designer of Central Park Frederick Law Olmsted is arguably the most important historical figure that the average American knows the least about. Best remembered for his landscape architecture, from New York's